Eagle Divorce Attorney | Idaho Divorce Law Firm | Family Lawyer

Eagle Divorce Attorney

Eagle is nestled in the foothills of Boise, Idaho, and is well known for its green spaces, hiking trails, a swimming beach, spas, and golf courses. Vendors who sell crafts and produce, as well as local musicians, set up on Saturdays in Heritage Park for the Eagle Saturday Market. While Eagle is a suburb of Boise, it retains its small-town atmosphere, going back to its roots as a farming community. Eagle boasts tree-lined streets and a number of parks throughout the city, with most subdivisions having sidewalks and walking paths. 

Although Eagle is only a few miles from downtown Boise, most conveniences can be found in Eagle, including high-end boutique shopping as well as chain stores. Eagle crime rates are low, the schools are above average, and this sleepy mountain suburb beckons to couples and families alike. Eagle is a tightly-knit community, friendly to families of all sizes. Families will enjoy an evening at Firebird Raceway, a trip to Lonesome Dove Ranch, or a jaunt in Friendship Park. 

Couples might enjoy Horse Ranch Vineyards or Olive & Vyne. Divorce in the state of Idaho is, unfortunately, extremely prevalent; Idaho ranked number four in the United States for the states with the highest number of divorces.

Eagle, on the other hand, did not make the list for the top ten cities in Idaho with the highest rates of divorce. If you are in the midst of a divorce, or even thinking of a divorce, the following information could help you through this difficult time in your life. 

Filing for Divorce in Eagle, Idaho

If you happen to be looking for a state that has an unusually short residence requirement for those seeking a divorce, Idaho is your state. The residency requirement for those living in Idaho is a mere six weeks. This means either you or your spouse must have lived in the state of Idaho for a minimum of six weeks, You will have to provide proof you have lived in the state for at least the last six weeks, and if you file the divorce complaint you will sign a statement swearing you have lived in the state for six weeks prior to filing for divorce. 

Should You File Your Divorce Under No-Fault or Fault-Based Idaho Law?

Idaho law allows for both a no-fault or a fault-based divorce. A no-fault divorce means you do not have to provide a reason for the divorce, rather you can simply say your marriage is over due to irreconcilable differences. If you choose to file a fault-based divorce, Idaho allows the following grounds: 

  • Extreme cruelty
  • Willful desertion (one spouse lived apart from the other for more than one year, with the intention of abandoning the marriage).
  • Adultery
  • A felony conviction on the part of one spouse
  • Habitual drunkenness for more than one year
  • Willful neglect (a spouse fails to provide the other with the common necessities of life for a period of at least one year, due to a refusal to work, or outright laziness).
  • Permanent insanity (one spouse must have been a resident of a mental institution for at least three years).
  • The spouses have been separated and have lived apart for at least five continuous years.

Division of Assets and Debts During Your Eagle Divorce?

If you are in the middle of an Idaho divorce, the division of marital assets and debts could be a major issue. There are nine states, including Idaho, that operate under community property laws, meaning all marital assets are divided 50/50, regardless of any extenuating circumstances. The other states in the nation operate under equitable distribution laws, meaning the marital assets may not be split right down the middle, rather they will be split fairly. 

This is an advantage for spouses who gave up education or career to help the other spouse gain a professional degree because they are compensated for that. In a community property state, it is unlikely the same spouse would be compensated for helping the other. Community property laws could work to your advantage, however, by dividing the assets in half, even if your financial contributions to the marriage were minor.  The judge will determine which assets are marital, and which are separate; any gift or inheritance acquired during the marriage is separate property so long as it was not commingled with marital property.

Are You Entitled to Alimony?

If you are unable to support yourself, the court could award permanent alimony, however, the judge will look at a number of factors prior to awarding alimony, including:

  • Your age
  • The length of your marriage
  • Your physical and emotional health
  • Your earning potential
  • The ability of your spouse to pay alimony

Even if you are entitled to alimony, if your spouse is unable to pay, you may not receive it. Judges usually award temporary alimony to help one spouse get through the divorce financially, short-term alimony to the spouse seeking an education or job skills, and permanent alimony when the spouse seeking support has significant needs and is unable to support himself or herself. 

Call Our Eagle Divorce and Family Attorney

When you are in the middle of a divorce, it can be a very emotional time. Even if you wanted the divorce, you are ending a chapter in your life, and the future can look pretty daunting. You need the time to feel what you feel and make decisions about your life after your marriage is over. You also need someone you trust to look out for your financial future, making sure you get what you deserve out of the marital assets, and on issues such as custody.

Having a highly-skilled Eagle divorce and family attorney in your corner is an invaluable resource that almost guarantees a better outcome for your divorce. We at Idaho Divorce Law Firm is here to help. We serve primarily in:

We're also proud to serve clients throughout Eagle and surrounding Idaho suburbs such as:

Our firm is here to help you. Call our Meridian office today at 208-900 6440 or Boise number at 208-900-6313 for a free consultation.